September 2016 fifth warmest since 1659

september-mean-cet-anomaly

September 2016 ended up the fifth warmest in the central England temperature [CET] series that began in 1659. I reckon the mean temperature for the month was 16.05°C, and the anomaly +2.53°C above the 1961-1990 long-term average. It never quite matched 2006 and almost caught 1949, and after all’s said and done that only makes it the warmest since 2006, the warmest September in the series.

warmest-september-cet

Both maximum and minimum temperatures were almost always above average for the entire month, with no real cold spell in evidence. Two new CET maximum records were set on the very warm spell on the 13th and 14th, and a new high minimum was also set on the 14th as well.

daily-cet-last-3-months-1-jul-30-sep-2016

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About xmetman

I am an exmetman who is passionate about all things to do with weather and climate. I have no axe to grind, and am continually upsetting people on both sides of the global warming debate with the articles that I publish, hell, I'm even banned from commenting on the Met Office's own blog! What I do fight for is the freeing up of climate, observational and forecast data collected and created on our behalf by the Meteorological Office.
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One Response to September 2016 fifth warmest since 1659

  1. oz4caster says:

    Nice work. An overall trend of 0.2C per 100 years does not seem very remarkable. The outliers, like September 2016 are primarily weather related. I notice that many of the monthly averages prior to about 1720 appear to be integers, much more than would be expected by random chance. That suggests the uncertainty in these early estimates is probably quite large and may be on the order of 1C. From what I recall reading about the making of the early averages, comparing now and then may be a bit of an apple to orange comparison, considering the differences in instruments and their calibration as well as observation methodology and frequency (or infrequency in the past).

    Like

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